Priscilla Becker’s first book of poems, Internal West, won The Paris Review Prize, and was published in 2003. Her poems have appeared in Fence, Open City, The Paris Review, Boston Review, Aufgabe, Raritan, Passages North, The Swallow Anthology of New American Poets, Verse, The Brooklyn Rail, and several others; her music reviews in The Nation and Filter magazine; her book reviews in The New York Sun; her fiction in The Literary Review, winner of The Charles Angoff prize; and her essays in Cabinet magazine and Open City. Her essays have also been anthologized by Soft Skull Press, Anchor Books, and Sarabande. Her second collection, Stories That Listen, was released by Four Way Books in the fall of 2010. She has completed a third book, Unaccompanied Voice, and a chapbook, Death Certificate, coming out via Ugly Duckling Presse. She teaches poetry at Pratt Institute, Columbia University, and in her apartment.

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One Response to “About”

  1. DawnMarie Young Says:

    I ordered ‘Internal West’ from my local Borders bookstore after reading an interview you gave in Poets & Writers back in 2003 (I think). Your poems are the best I have ever read and I am so excited to see you have another collection coming out. Through the years since first reading you, I have searched for more of your work through my local bookstores. A similar search on my computer led me to your site, which I have bookmarked.

    I think your poems are amazing and they continue to inspire me to write and refine my own poems.

    Thank you so much for adding beauty to the world through your poems.

    ~ DawnMarie Young


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